Book Of Traceable Heraldic Art

Volume O: Escutcheon Outlines

Combined PDF file (45 pages; 134KB)

Cover Page §

Device Outline §

Field
Surround

Devices are generally submitted on a standard shield outline, known as an escutcheon.

Square Field §

Field
Surround

Badges are submitted on a square outline, even if they are fieldless.

Lozenge Field §

Field
Surround

Devices may be submitted on a lozenge, a less-martial alternative to the shield outline.

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Circular Field

Badges are often displayed on a circle, called a roundel.

– O.5

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Oval Field

Devices may be displayed an oval shape known as a cartouche.

– O.6

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Heart Field

Heart shapes were occasionally used to diplay armory.

– O.7

Roman Scutum §

Field
Surround

Roman legionaries carried large rectangular shields with a domed central boss.

Kite Outline (1) §

Field
Surround

Tall shields with a round top and a long tapered point were typical in the 11th C..

Kite Outline (2) §

Field
Surround

Source: Adapted from the seal of Mathilde, wife of Philippe d'Alsace, count of Flanders, circa 1189.

Truncated Kite §

Field
Surround

Later versions of the kite shield had their tops flattened, but retained the pronounced point.

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Triangular Shield (1)

Source: Adapted from the seal of Robert de Chartres, circa 1193. – O.12 –

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Triangular Shield (2)

Source: Adapted from the seal of Gautier de Chatéron, circa 1210. – O.13 –

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Heater Shield (1)

Adapted from the seal of Gilles d'Aunay, circa 1245. – O.14 –

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Heater Shield (2)

Adapted from the seal of Philippe III of France, circa 1285. – O.15 –

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Heater Shield (3)

Adapted from the seal of Louis II d'Anjou, circa 1403. – O.16 –

Almond Shield §

Field
Surround

The almond shape is a pinched oval characteristic of early Italian armorials.

Iberian U-Shaped Shield §

In Spain and Portugal, arms were usually displayed on an escutcheon with a round base.

German U-Shaped Shield §

In German areas, the round base was sometimes combined with sloping sides.

Tilting Shield §

Fifteenth-century arms might be shown on a shape suggestive of a tournament tilting shield.

Tilting Shield 2 §

Fifteenth-century arms might be shown on a shape suggestive of a tournament tilting shield.

Tilting Shield 3 §

Fifteenth-century arms might be shown on a shape suggestive of a tournament tilting shield.

Italian Tilting Shield §

This shield shape is found in Venete con le Loro Armi from the early sixteenth century. .

Renaissance Shield §

As time passed, the shapes used for escutcheons became progressively more ornate.

Foliate Renaissance Shield §

As time passed, the shapes used for escutcheons became progressively more ornate.

Polish Renaissance Shield §

As time passed, the shapes used for escutcheons became progressively more ornate.

Spanish Renaissance (1) §

Field
Surround

This shield shape is found in "Armas de los Condes" from the early sixteenth century.

Italian Renaissance §

Field
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This shield shape is found in Stemme Veneziane from the mid-sixteenth century.

Horsehead Shield §

Field
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Italian Renaissance armorials sometimes used a testa di cavallo, or horse-head shield.

German Tournament §

Field
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Germanic tournament shields often had fluted ridges and points around the edge.

English Tournament §

Field
Surround

This shield shape is found on the stall plate of John Beaufort, Duke of Somerset, circa 1440.

Embowed Heater §

This escutcheon is based on a standard heater-shield shape but the top is arched up.

Moorish Adarga §

A rounded, two-lobed shape derived from Berber calvary shields.

Adapted from a photo of Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna's item HJRK C 195. (Grenada, circa 1490.)

Spanish Adarga §

A rounded, two-lobed shape derived from Berber calvary shields.

Adapted from the painting "Saint Vincent and Saint Valerius in Prision." (Spain, circa 1495.)

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Italian Adarga

A rounded, two-lobed shape derived from Berber calvary shields.

Source: Cappugi 200. (Italy, eighteenth century.) – O.37 –

Square English §

A wide shield with an expanded base allowed for marshaled arms to be displayed together.

Late-Period English §

A rectangular shield with small flared corners provided space for complex Tudor designs

Engrailed English §

The rounded notches in the upper edge of this shield are a late-period decelopment.

Pentagonal English §

An extra-wide shield.

Source: University of Victoria Ms.Brown.Eng.2. (Circa 1580)

Engrailed Heater (1) §

The rounded notches in the upper edge of this shield are a late-period decelopment.

Engrailed Heater (2) §

The curving peak on the upper edge of this shield may be a post-period affectation.

Octagon Ployé §

Field
Surround

Devices may be displayed on a modified lozenge that has been expanded into an octagon.

Federal Shield §

This post-period shield shape is used the the U.S. government for highways and police.