Book Of Traceable Heraldic Art

Plumetty

See also: Plumetty in Pictorial Dictionary of Heraldry.

Plumetty (Fur, 1) §

Device
Badge

Neutral fur, related to vair. Two contrasting tinctures. Blazoned “plumetty tincture and tincture.”

See also the plumetty field treatment, which is blazoned “tincture plumetty tincture .”

Term is French, suggesting feathers.

Very rare in period armory.

Plumetty (Fur, 2) §

Device
Badge

Neutral fur, related to vair. Two contrasting tinctures. Blazoned “plumetty tincture and tincture.”

See also the plumetty field treatment, which is blazoned “tincture plumetty tincture .”

Term is French, suggesting feathers. Very rare in period armory.

Source: Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893. Artist unknown.

Plumetty (Fur, 3) §

Device
Badge

Neutral fur, related to vair. Two contrasting tinctures. Blazoned “plumetty tincture and tincture.” See also the plumetty field treatment, which is blazoned “tincture plumetty tincture .”

Term is French, suggesting feathers. This example should probably be considered poor style due to lack of internal detailing.

Source: Two Tudor Books of Arms. Artist: Robert Cooke. (Page 54.)

Plumetty (Fur, 4) §

Device
Badge

Neutral fur, related to vair. Two contrasting tinctures. Blazoned “plumetty tincture and tincture.”

See also the plumetty field treatment, which is blazoned “tincture plumetty tincture .”

Term is French, suggesting feathers. Very rare in period armory.

Source: Armorial et Traité d'Héraldique. Artist unknown. (Folio 176v.)

Plumetty (Treatment, 1) §

Device
Badge

Must use two contrasting tinctures.

Background blazoned first, as “tincture plumetty tincture.” See also the plumetty neutral fur, which is blazoned “plumetty tincture and tincture.” Term is French, suggesting feathers.

Source: Armorial et Traité d'Héraldique. Artist unknown. (Folio 176v.)

Plumetty (Treatment, 2) §

Device
Badge

Must use two contrasting tinctures.

Background blazoned first, as “tincture plumetty tincture.” See also the plumetty neutral fur, which is blazoned “plumetty tincture and tincture.” Term is French, suggesting feathers.

Source: Armorial Le Breton. Artist unknown. (Page 52.)