Book Of Traceable Heraldic Art

Volume W: Display Worksheets

Combined PDF file (76 pages; 3MB)

Cover Page §

Heater Field §

Devices are generally submitted on a standard shield outline, known as an escutcheon.

Square Field §

Field
Surround

Badges are submitted on a square outline, even if they are fieldless.

Lozenge Field §

Field
Surround

Devices may be submitted on a lozenge, a less-martial alternative to the shield outline.

Circular Field §

Field
Surround

Badges are often displayed on a circle, called a roundel.

Oval Field §

Field
Surround

Devices may be displayed an oval shape known as a cartouche.

Heart Field §

Field
Surround

Heart shapes were occasionally used to diplay armory.

Roman Scutum §

Field
Surround

Roman legionaries carried large rectangular shields with a domed central boss.

Kite Shield §

Tall shields with a round top and a long tapered point were typical in the 11th C..

Truncated Kite §

Field
Surround

Later versions of the kite shield had their tops flattened, but retained the pronounced point.

Almond Shield §

Field
Surround

The almond shape is a pinched oval characteristic of early Italian armorials.

Iberian §

In Spain and Portugal, arms were usually displayed on an escutcheon with a round base.

Tilting Shield §

Fifteenth-century arms might be shown on a shape suggestive of a tournament tilting shield.

Italian Tilting Shield §

This shield shape is found in Venete con le Loro Armi from the early sixteenth century. .

Renaissance Shield §

As time passed, the shapes used for escutcheons became progressively more ornate.

Foliate Renaissance Shield §

As time passed, the shapes used for escutcheons became progressively more ornate.

Polish Renaissance Shield §

As time passed, the shapes used for escutcheons became progressively more ornate.

Spanish Renaissance §

This shield shape is found in "Armas de los Condes" from the early sixteenth century.

Spanish Renaissance 2 §

This shield shape is found in "Nobiliario de Armas de Valencia" from the sixteenth century.

Italian Renaissance §

Field
Surround

This shield shape is found in Stemme Veneziane from the mid-sixteenth century.

Horsehead Shield §

Field
Surround

Italian Renaissance armorials sometimes used a testa di cavallo, or horse-head shield.

German Tournament §

Field
Surround

Germanic tournament shields often had fluted ridges and points around the edge.

English Tournament §

Field
Surround

This shield shape is found on the stall plate of John Beaufort, Duke of Somerset, circa 1440.

Square English §

A wide shield with an expanded base allowed for marshaled arms to be displayed together.

Pentagonal English §

An extra-wide shield.

Source: University of Victoria Ms.Brown.Eng.2. (Circa 1580)

Engrailed Heater 2 §

The curving peak on the upper edge of this shield may be a post-period affectation.

Octagon Ployé §

Field
Surround

Devices may be displayed on a modified lozenge that has been expanded into an octagon.

German 16th C. Frame §

German 16th C. Lozenge §

Italian 16th C. Frame §

Source: Nobilium Mediolanensium. (Circa 1555.) Adapted by Saewynn aet Cnolle.

Surround

17th C. Scrollwork §

Circa 1650.

Draped Achievement §

Tilted Shield with Draped Helm (1) §

Tilted Shield with Draped Helm (2) §

Tilted Shield with Draped Helm (3) §

Shield with Helm & Mantling §

Banner §

A banner is a type of medieval armorial flag, displaying the bearer’s arms.

Banners and Lances §

Surround

Banner and Lance (4) §

Source: Manchester Latin MS 28. (Folio 17r.)

Surround

Banner and Lance (5) §

Banner and Pole §

Source: Chronica Maiora. (Representation of the Oriflamme.)

Surround

Quarter-Circle Banner (1) §

Fragmentary evidence suggests some Vikings flew banners shapped like quarter-circles.

Surround

Quarter-Circle Banner (2) §

Fragmentary evidence suggests some Vikings flew banners shapped like quarter-circles.

Gonfalon 1 §

A gonfalon is a type of medieval armorial flag, hung from a crossbar along the top edge.

Gonfalon 2 §

A gonfalon is a type of medieval armorial flag, hung from a crossbar along the top edge.

Gonfalon 3 §

Field
Surround

A gonfalon is a type of medieval armorial flag, hung from a crossbar along the top edge.

Pennons §

Badges are sometimes displayed on a pennon, a long, narrow type of medieval flag.

Field

Standards §

Badges are sometimes displayed on a standard, a long, narrow type of medieval flag.

Surround

Tudor Standards §

These standards are traced from Wriothesley's Funeral Banners, circa 1545.

Standard and Lance §

Standards and Lances §

Badges are sometimes displayed on a standard, a long, narrow type of medieval flag.

Surround

Fluttering Standards (1) §

Artist: Elspeth Farre.

Field

Fluttering Standards (2) §

Source: Nobiliario de Armas de Valencia, Aragón y Cataluña. Artist unknown. (Folio 69v.)

Guidon and Lance §

Field
Surround

A guidon is a shorter version of a standard, used by non-royal military commanders.

Pennon and Lance §

Source: Manchester Latin MS 28. (Folio 39r.)

Surround

Trumpet Banner §

Surround

Heraldic Tabard (1) §

Surround

Heraldic Tabard (2) §

Field

Tabard with Helm and Banners §

Surcoat §

Field
Surround

Over their armor, fighters might wear a surcoat emblazoned with their arms or livery colors.

Banner and Shield §

Knights might bear their arms on both a flag and their shield.

Mounted Knight §

Horse barding may show a rider’s arms.

Source: The Boys' and Girls' Readers, E. Bolenius, 1919.

English 14th C. Couple §

Sir John de la Pole and wife.

Source: Monumental brasses and slabs, Charles Boutell, 1847.

English 14th C. Cotehardie §

Daughter of Edward III.

Source: Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893.

English 14th C. Sideless Gown §

English Late 14th C. Cotehardie §

English 14th C. Lord §

The Black Prince, Son of Edward III.

Source: Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893.

English 15th C. Gentleman §